About TRI

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is one of 60 institutions chosen by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help scientists achieve better, faster and more relevant results for public health. The NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award program, along with a significant UAMS commitment, enabled the creation of the Translational Research Institute (TRI) in 2009.

TRI is providing innovative resources, such as the Enterprise Data Warehouse, which can provide de-identified clinical information on nearly 1 million patients, and key infrastructure, such as patient rooms, imaging equipment and nurses, all dedicated to clinical research. Expert staff assist researchers to navigate the UAMS research infrastructure and facilitate access to UAMS and TRI resources available for clinical and translational research, ensuring researchers receive timely and appropriate support. To address health disparities, the institute fosters long-term partnerships with communities to help guide the development of meaningful research projects. In other words, TRI is helping “translate” our most relevant knowledge and discoveries to the clinics and people who need it.

TRI’s mission is to improve the health status of Arkansans by:

  • Stimulating cooperative research that accelerates the translation and application of scientific discoveries into clinical and community settings
  • Providing mentorship and other resources to both new and experienced researchers
  • Disseminating research findings to communities
  • Advocating for responsive health policy changes to improve health outcomes

The Translational Research Institute (TRI) at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program, grants UL1TR000039 and KL2TR000063. The CTSA program is led by the NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). The content of this website is solely the responsibility of UAMS and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

All publications, patents, projects, etc., resulting from the utilization of TRI resources are required to credit the TRI grant by including the NIH Funding Acknowledgment and must comply with NIH Public Access Policy.